Important Water Level Bulletin August 14th, 2019

Many lakes are forecast to drop by between 20 and 50 cms. over the next two weeks. Over the last 6 to 8 weeks there has been very little rainfall over the northern half of the Trent Basin including the Kawartha Lakes and the Reservoir area. What rain there has been has been in the form of spotty thunderstorms with no prolonged general rainfall.

The TSW has been managing the Canal at minimum flows in order to conserve available water. But the drought conditions and high temperatures causing evaporation have meant it is necessary to draw extra water from the reservoirs. In a few cases, this has already resulted in below average levels for this date. However in the absence of significant general rainfall, we are now facing the prospect of below average levels on many reservoir lakes.

In both 2016 and in 2018, we faced periods of drought across the basin. In 2016, the relief came with significant rainfall after August 15th, while in 2018 the relief came in late July. In both cases extreme drawdown was then not necessary. Now in 2019, we need significant rainfall to offset the risk of exceptionally low levels by later in the season.

All residents are reminded to monitor the weekly water level forecasts from TSW as well as the Water Management Updates which are posted on the TSW Website and reposted by CEWF on our website, WWW.CEWF.CA . The conditions are changing constantly and water level management decisions are made on a daily basis reflecting current levels, flows and rainfall events.

How to find the current water level of Gull Lake. A step by step guide…

How to find the water level of Gull Lake…

Parks Canada monitors and posts the water levels of the Trent-Severn Waterway Watershed, of which we are a part of. The levels are updated on a regular basis, so there is no static link. Follow these simple steps.

To navigate to the Parks Canada web page, click the button below:

Scroll down until you see the image below. This is a screenshot, not an active web page. On the active web page click on Gull River.

Scroll down until you see the above image and click on the Gull River.

Scroll down until you see the above image and click on the Gull River.

 

The next image you should see is the map of the Gull River watershed. The tab for Gull Lake is at the south end of the lake and sits almost behind the Moore Lake tab. You can click on the PLUS sign to enlarge the map a bit to get better access to the Gull Lake tab. When you hover over the tabs, the information for that tab pops up. Click on the tab so that the information stays up, and then click on Level Gauge.

The next image you should see is the map of the Gull River. The tab for Gull Lake is at the south end of the lake and sits almost behind the Moore Lake tab. You can click on the PLUS sign to enlarge the map a bit to get better access to the Gull Lake tab. When you hover over the tabs, the information pops up. Click on the tab so that the information stays up, and then click on Level Gauge.
 

Your final image should look like the one below, but with the current date and current water level.

Your final image should look like this, but with the current date.